Ad Reinhardt, 1963

Ad Reinhardt, 1963, 2007

70 x 100 cm

Original posters, edition 10+2AP

The project confronts the hypothetical program of the “lost museum” designed by the Polish architect, Oskar Hansen, in 1964. After the earthquake that devastated Skopje, Macedonia on July 26th, 1963, a competition was proposed for a new museum. Meant to become a symbol of the city’s “immortality”, the competition for the design of a new art institution was supported by the Polish government as a gesture of solidarity with the Macedonians and was open exclusively to architects from Eastern Block countries. Oskar Hansen’s proposal for the museum was to consist of “a transformable exhibition space, able to fold completely and then unfold into various combinations, with hexagonal elements lifted by hydraulically-powered rotating telescopes.” The structure would transform in horizontal and vertical dimensions at the same time. In the proposal the architect wrote: “Art in its development is unpredictable. We have assumed that a contemporary gallery should pursue the unknown in art. It shouldn’t only aim at exhibiting artworks, but also encouraging and provoking their birth.” Hansen’s design was not implemented. The jury finally selected a design submitted by a team of three Polish architects: W. Klyzewski, J. Mokrzynski and E. Wierzbicki. The project by Calovski and Ivanoska is a study of multiple hypotheses surrounding the reading of art historical references. It manifests a view on historical analysis involving the documentation of Hansen’s proposal and of the possible exhibition and lecture program. The series of 12 original, limited edition posters announcing and in a way materializing the programming for the institution, would have engaged such artists as Paul Thek, Mladen Stilinovic, Andrzej Szewczyk, Ana Mendieta, Ad Reinhardt, and others. The posters were designed in close collaboration with the young German designer, Ariane Spanier.

Process and Art Competition Entry (1), Museum of Modern Art Skopje, 1966

Process and Art Competition Entry (1), Museum of Modern Art Skopje, 1966, 2007

70 x 100 cm

Original posters, edition 10+2AP

The project confronts the hypothetical program of the “lost museum” designed by the Polish architect, Oskar Hansen, in 1964. After the earthquake that devastated Skopje, Macedonia on July 26th, 1963, a competition was proposed for a new museum. Meant to become a symbol of the city’s “immortality”, the competition for the design of a new art institution was supported by the Polish government as a gesture of solidarity with the Macedonians and was open exclusively to architects from Eastern Block countries. Oskar Hansen’s proposal for the museum was to consist of “a transformable exhibition space, able to fold completely and then unfold into various combinations, with hexagonal elements lifted by hydraulically-powered rotating telescopes.” The structure would transform in horizontal and vertical dimensions at the same time. In the proposal the architect wrote: “Art in its development is unpredictable. We have assumed that a contemporary gallery should pursue the unknown in art. It shouldn’t only aim at exhibiting artworks, but also encouraging and provoking their birth.” Hansen’s design was not implemented. The jury finally selected a design submitted by a team of three Polish architects: W. Klyzewski, J. Mokrzynski and E. Wierzbicki. The project by Calovski and Ivanoska is a study of multiple hypotheses surrounding the reading of art historical references. It manifests a view on historical analysis involving the documentation of Hansen’s proposal and of the possible exhibition and lecture program. The series of 12 original, limited edition posters announcing and in a way materializing the programming for the institution, would have engaged such artists as Paul Thek, Mladen Stilinovic, Andrzej Szewczyk, Ana Mendieta, Ad Reinhardt, and others. The posters were designed in close collaboration with the young German designer, Ariane Spanier.

Process and Art Competition Entry (2), Museum of Modern Art Skopje, 1966

Process and Art Competition Entry (2), Museum of Modern Art Skopje, 1966, 2007

70 x 100 cm

Original posters, edition 10+2AP

The project confronts the hypothetical program of the “lost museum” designed by the Polish architect, Oskar Hansen, in 1964. After the earthquake that devastated Skopje, Macedonia on July 26th, 1963, a competition was proposed for a new museum. Meant to become a symbol of the city’s “immortality”, the competition for the design of a new art institution was supported by the Polish government as a gesture of solidarity with the Macedonians and was open exclusively to architects from Eastern Block countries. Oskar Hansen’s proposal for the museum was to consist of “a transformable exhibition space, able to fold completely and then unfold into various combinations, with hexagonal elements lifted by hydraulically-powered rotating telescopes.” The structure would transform in horizontal and vertical dimensions at the same time. In the proposal the architect wrote: “Art in its development is unpredictable. We have assumed that a contemporary gallery should pursue the unknown in art. It shouldn’t only aim at exhibiting artworks, but also encouraging and provoking their birth.” Hansen’s design was not implemented. The jury finally selected a design submitted by a team of three Polish architects: W. Klyzewski, J. Mokrzynski and E. Wierzbicki. The project by Calovski and Ivanoska is a study of multiple hypotheses surrounding the reading of art historical references. It manifests a view on historical analysis involving the documentation of Hansen’s proposal and of the possible exhibition and lecture program. The series of 12 original, limited edition posters announcing and in a way materializing the programming for the institution, would have engaged such artists as Paul Thek, Mladen Stilinovic, Andrzej Szewczyk, Ana Mendieta, Ad Reinhardt, and others. The posters were designed in close collaboration with the young German designer, Ariane Spanier.

Process and Art Competition Entry (3), Museum of Modern Art Skopje, 1966

Process and Art Competition Entry (3), Museum of Modern Art Skopje, 1966, 2007

70 x 100 cm

Original posters, edition 10+2AP

The project confronts the hypothetical program of the “lost museum” designed by the Polish architect, Oskar Hansen, in 1964. After the earthquake that devastated Skopje, Macedonia on July 26th, 1963, a competition was proposed for a new museum. Meant to become a symbol of the city’s “immortality”, the competition for the design of a new art institution was supported by the Polish government as a gesture of solidarity with the Macedonians and was open exclusively to architects from Eastern Block countries. Oskar Hansen’s proposal for the museum was to consist of “a transformable exhibition space, able to fold completely and then unfold into various combinations, with hexagonal elements lifted by hydraulically-powered rotating telescopes.” The structure would transform in horizontal and vertical dimensions at the same time. In the proposal the architect wrote: “Art in its development is unpredictable. We have assumed that a contemporary gallery should pursue the unknown in art. It shouldn’t only aim at exhibiting artworks, but also encouraging and provoking their birth.” Hansen’s design was not implemented. The jury finally selected a design submitted by a team of three Polish architects: W. Klyzewski, J. Mokrzynski and E. Wierzbicki. The project by Calovski and Ivanoska is a study of multiple hypotheses surrounding the reading of art historical references. It manifests a view on historical analysis involving the documentation of Hansen’s proposal and of the possible exhibition and lecture program. The series of 12 original, limited edition posters announcing and in a way materializing the programming for the institution, would have engaged such artists as Paul Thek, Mladen Stilinovic, Andrzej Szewczyk, Ana Mendieta, Ad Reinhardt, and others. The posters were designed in close collaboration with the young German designer, Ariane Spanier.

Dusan Percinkov, Remains of a Summer Day, 1968

Dusan Percinkov, Remains of a Summer Day, 1968, 2007

70 x 100 cm

Original posters, edition 10+2AP

The project confronts the hypothetical program of the “lost museum” designed by the Polish architect, Oskar Hansen, in 1964. After the earthquake that devastated Skopje, Macedonia on July 26th, 1963, a competition was proposed for a new museum. Meant to become a symbol of the city’s “immortality”, the competition for the design of a new art institution was supported by the Polish government as a gesture of solidarity with the Macedonians and was open exclusively to architects from Eastern Block countries. Oskar Hansen’s proposal for the museum was to consist of “a transformable exhibition space, able to fold completely and then unfold into various combinations, with hexagonal elements lifted by hydraulically-powered rotating telescopes.” The structure would transform in horizontal and vertical dimensions at the same time. In the proposal the architect wrote: “Art in its development is unpredictable. We have assumed that a contemporary gallery should pursue the unknown in art. It shouldn’t only aim at exhibiting artworks, but also encouraging and provoking their birth.” Hansen’s design was not implemented. The jury finally selected a design submitted by a team of three Polish architects: W. Klyzewski, J. Mokrzynski and E. Wierzbicki. The project by Calovski and Ivanoska is a study of multiple hypotheses surrounding the reading of art historical references. It manifests a view on historical analysis involving the documentation of Hansen’s proposal and of the possible exhibition and lecture program. The series of 12 original, limited edition posters announcing and in a way materializing the programming for the institution, would have engaged such artists as Paul Thek, Mladen Stilinovic, Andrzej Szewczyk, Ana Mendieta, Ad Reinhardt, and others. The posters were designed in close collaboration with the young German designer, Ariane Spanier.

Ana Mendieta, People looking at Blood (Rape Scene), 1973

Ana Mendieta, People looking at Blood (Rape Scene), 1973, 2007

70 x 100 cm

Original posters, edition 10+2AP

The project confronts the hypothetical program of the “lost museum” designed by the Polish architect, Oskar Hansen, in 1964. After the earthquake that devastated Skopje, Macedonia on July 26th, 1963, a competition was proposed for a new museum. Meant to become a symbol of the city’s “immortality”, the competition for the design of a new art institution was supported by the Polish government as a gesture of solidarity with the Macedonians and was open exclusively to architects from Eastern Block countries. Oskar Hansen’s proposal for the museum was to consist of “a transformable exhibition space, able to fold completely and then unfold into various combinations, with hexagonal elements lifted by hydraulically-powered rotating telescopes.” The structure would transform in horizontal and vertical dimensions at the same time. In the proposal the architect wrote: “Art in its development is unpredictable. We have assumed that a contemporary gallery should pursue the unknown in art. It shouldn’t only aim at exhibiting artworks, but also encouraging and provoking their birth.” Hansen’s design was not implemented. The jury finally selected a design submitted by a team of three Polish architects: W. Klyzewski, J. Mokrzynski and E. Wierzbicki. The project by Calovski and Ivanoska is a study of multiple hypotheses surrounding the reading of art historical references. It manifests a view on historical analysis involving the documentation of Hansen’s proposal and of the possible exhibition and lecture program. The series of 12 original, limited edition posters announcing and in a way materializing the programming for the institution, would have engaged such artists as Paul Thek, Mladen Stilinovic, Andrzej Szewczyk, Ana Mendieta, Ad Reinhardt, and others. The posters were designed in close collaboration with the young German designer, Ariane Spanier.

Paul Thek, A life in which there seems to be no winning, 1974

Paul Thek, A life in which there seems to be no winning, 1974, 2007

70 x 100 cm

Original posters, edition 10+2AP

The project confronts the hypothetical program of the “lost museum” designed by the Polish architect, Oskar Hansen, in 1964. After the earthquake that devastated Skopje, Macedonia on July 26th, 1963, a competition was proposed for a new museum. Meant to become a symbol of the city’s “immortality”, the competition for the design of a new art institution was supported by the Polish government as a gesture of solidarity with the Macedonians and was open exclusively to architects from Eastern Block countries. Oskar Hansen’s proposal for the museum was to consist of “a transformable exhibition space, able to fold completely and then unfold into various combinations, with hexagonal elements lifted by hydraulically-powered rotating telescopes.” The structure would transform in horizontal and vertical dimensions at the same time. In the proposal the architect wrote: “Art in its development is unpredictable. We have assumed that a contemporary gallery should pursue the unknown in art. It shouldn’t only aim at exhibiting artworks, but also encouraging and provoking their birth.” Hansen’s design was not implemented. The jury finally selected a design submitted by a team of three Polish architects: W. Klyzewski, J. Mokrzynski and E. Wierzbicki. The project by Calovski and Ivanoska is a study of multiple hypotheses surrounding the reading of art historical references. It manifests a view on historical analysis involving the documentation of Hansen’s proposal and of the possible exhibition and lecture program. The series of 12 original, limited edition posters announcing and in a way materializing the programming for the institution, would have engaged such artists as Paul Thek, Mladen Stilinovic, Andrzej Szewczyk, Ana Mendieta, Ad Reinhardt, and others. The posters were designed in close collaboration with the young German designer, Ariane Spanier.

Susan lecturing on Nietzsche, 1987

Susan lecturing on Nietzsche, 1987, 2007

70 x 100 cm

Original posters, edition 10+2AP

The project confronts the hypothetical program of the “lost museum” designed by the Polish architect, Oskar Hansen, in 1964. After the earthquake that devastated Skopje, Macedonia on July 26th, 1963, a competition was proposed for a new museum. Meant to become a symbol of the city’s “immortality”, the competition for the design of a new art institution was supported by the Polish government as a gesture of solidarity with the Macedonians and was open exclusively to architects from Eastern Block countries. Oskar Hansen’s proposal for the museum was to consist of “a transformable exhibition space, able to fold completely and then unfold into various combinations, with hexagonal elements lifted by hydraulically-powered rotating telescopes.” The structure would transform in horizontal and vertical dimensions at the same time. In the proposal the architect wrote: “Art in its development is unpredictable. We have assumed that a contemporary gallery should pursue the unknown in art. It shouldn’t only aim at exhibiting artworks, but also encouraging and provoking their birth.” Hansen’s design was not implemented. The jury finally selected a design submitted by a team of three Polish architects: W. Klyzewski, J. Mokrzynski and E. Wierzbicki. The project by Calovski and Ivanoska is a study of multiple hypotheses surrounding the reading of art historical references. It manifests a view on historical analysis involving the documentation of Hansen’s proposal and of the possible exhibition and lecture program. The series of 12 original, limited edition posters announcing and in a way materializing the programming for the institution, would have engaged such artists as Paul Thek, Mladen Stilinovic, Andrzej Szewczyk, Ana Mendieta, Ad Reinhardt, and others. The posters were designed in close collaboration with the young German designer, Ariane Spanier.

Painting is black, Sculpture is white, Architecture is Color, 1996

Painting is black, Sculpture is white, Architecture is Color, 1996, 2007

70 x 100 cm

Original posters, edition 10+2AP

The project confronts the hypothetical program of the “lost museum” designed by the Polish architect, Oskar Hansen, in 1964. After the earthquake that devastated Skopje, Macedonia on July 26th, 1963, a competition was proposed for a new museum. Meant to become a symbol of the city’s “immortality”, the competition for the design of a new art institution was supported by the Polish government as a gesture of solidarity with the Macedonians and was open exclusively to architects from Eastern Block countries. Oskar Hansen’s proposal for the museum was to consist of “a transformable exhibition space, able to fold completely and then unfold into various combinations, with hexagonal elements lifted by hydraulically-powered rotating telescopes.” The structure would transform in horizontal and vertical dimensions at the same time. In the proposal the architect wrote: “Art in its development is unpredictable. We have assumed that a contemporary gallery should pursue the unknown in art. It shouldn’t only aim at exhibiting artworks, but also encouraging and provoking their birth.” Hansen’s design was not implemented. The jury finally selected a design submitted by a team of three Polish architects: W. Klyzewski, J. Mokrzynski and E. Wierzbicki. The project by Calovski and Ivanoska is a study of multiple hypotheses surrounding the reading of art historical references. It manifests a view on historical analysis involving the documentation of Hansen’s proposal and of the possible exhibition and lecture program. The series of 12 original, limited edition posters announcing and in a way materializing the programming for the institution, would have engaged such artists as Paul Thek, Mladen Stilinovic, Andrzej Szewczyk, Ana Mendieta, Ad Reinhardt, and others. The posters were designed in close collaboration with the young German designer, Ariane Spanier.

Mladen Stilinovic, A reading featuring the Text in Praise of Laziness, 1998

Mladen Stilinovic, A reading featuring the Text in Praise of Laziness, 1998, 2007

70 x 100 cm

Original posters, edition 10+2AP

The project confronts the hypothetical program of the “lost museum” designed by the Polish architect, Oskar Hansen, in 1964. After the earthquake that devastated Skopje, Macedonia on July 26th, 1963, a competition was proposed for a new museum. Meant to become a symbol of the city’s “immortality”, the competition for the design of a new art institution was supported by the Polish government as a gesture of solidarity with the Macedonians and was open exclusively to architects from Eastern Block countries. Oskar Hansen’s proposal for the museum was to consist of “a transformable exhibition space, able to fold completely and then unfold into various combinations, with hexagonal elements lifted by hydraulically-powered rotating telescopes.” The structure would transform in horizontal and vertical dimensions at the same time. In the proposal the architect wrote: “Art in its development is unpredictable. We have assumed that a contemporary gallery should pursue the unknown in art. It shouldn’t only aim at exhibiting artworks, but also encouraging and provoking their birth.” Hansen’s design was not implemented. The jury finally selected a design submitted by a team of three Polish architects: W. Klyzewski, J. Mokrzynski and E. Wierzbicki. The project by Calovski and Ivanoska is a study of multiple hypotheses surrounding the reading of art historical references. It manifests a view on historical analysis involving the documentation of Hansen’s proposal and of the possible exhibition and lecture program. The series of 12 original, limited edition posters announcing and in a way materializing the programming for the institution, would have engaged such artists as Paul Thek, Mladen Stilinovic, Andrzej Szewczyk, Ana Mendieta, Ad Reinhardt, and others. The posters were designed in close collaboration with the young German designer, Ariane Spanier.

Only a bad artist thinks he has a good idea. A good artist does not need anything. 2007

Only a bad artist thinks he has a good idea. A good artist does not need anything. 2007, 2007

70 x 100 cm

Original posters, edition 10+2AP

The project confronts the hypothetical program of the “lost museum” designed by the Polish architect, Oskar Hansen, in 1964. After the earthquake that devastated Skopje, Macedonia on July 26th, 1963, a competition was proposed for a new museum. Meant to become a symbol of the city’s “immortality”, the competition for the design of a new art institution was supported by the Polish government as a gesture of solidarity with the Macedonians and was open exclusively to architects from Eastern Block countries. Oskar Hansen’s proposal for the museum was to consist of “a transformable exhibition space, able to fold completely and then unfold into various combinations, with hexagonal elements lifted by hydraulically-powered rotating telescopes.” The structure would transform in horizontal and vertical dimensions at the same time. In the proposal the architect wrote: “Art in its development is unpredictable. We have assumed that a contemporary gallery should pursue the unknown in art. It shouldn’t only aim at exhibiting artworks, but also encouraging and provoking their birth.” Hansen’s design was not implemented. The jury finally selected a design submitted by a team of three Polish architects: W. Klyzewski, J. Mokrzynski and E. Wierzbicki. The project by Calovski and Ivanoska is a study of multiple hypotheses surrounding the reading of art historical references. It manifests a view on historical analysis involving the documentation of Hansen’s proposal and of the possible exhibition and lecture program. The series of 12 original, limited edition posters announcing and in a way materializing the programming for the institution, would have engaged such artists as Paul Thek, Mladen Stilinovic, Andrzej Szewczyk, Ana Mendieta, Ad Reinhardt, and others. The posters were designed in close collaboration with the young German designer, Ariane Spanier.

Andrzej Szewczyk, Paintings from Chlopy, 2008

Andrzej Szewczyk, Paintings from Chlopy, 2008, 2007

70 x 100 cm

Original posters, edition 10+2AP

The project confronts the hypothetical program of the “lost museum” designed by the Polish architect, Oskar Hansen, in 1964. After the earthquake that devastated Skopje, Macedonia on July 26th, 1963, a competition was proposed for a new museum. Meant to become a symbol of the city’s “immortality”, the competition for the design of a new art institution was supported by the Polish government as a gesture of solidarity with the Macedonians and was open exclusively to architects from Eastern Block countries. Oskar Hansen’s proposal for the museum was to consist of “a transformable exhibition space, able to fold completely and then unfold into various combinations, with hexagonal elements lifted by hydraulically-powered rotating telescopes.” The structure would transform in horizontal and vertical dimensions at the same time. In the proposal the architect wrote: “Art in its development is unpredictable. We have assumed that a contemporary gallery should pursue the unknown in art. It shouldn’t only aim at exhibiting artworks, but also encouraging and provoking their birth.” Hansen’s design was not implemented. The jury finally selected a design submitted by a team of three Polish architects: W. Klyzewski, J. Mokrzynski and E. Wierzbicki. The project by Calovski and Ivanoska is a study of multiple hypotheses surrounding the reading of art historical references. It manifests a view on historical analysis involving the documentation of Hansen’s proposal and of the possible exhibition and lecture program. The series of 12 original, limited edition posters announcing and in a way materializing the programming for the institution, would have engaged such artists as Paul Thek, Mladen Stilinovic, Andrzej Szewczyk, Ana Mendieta, Ad Reinhardt, and others. The posters were designed in close collaboration with the young German designer, Ariane Spanier.

Exhibition View at HDLU Zagreb

Exhibition View at HDLU Zagreb, 2009

The project confronts the hypothetical program of the “lost museum” designed by the Polish architect, Oskar Hansen, in 1964. After the earthquake that devastated Skopje, Macedonia on July 26th, 1963, a competition was proposed for a new museum. Meant to become a symbol of the city’s “immortality”, the competition for the design of a new art institution was supported by the Polish government as a gesture of solidarity with the Macedonians and was open exclusively to architects from Eastern Block countries. Oskar Hansen’s proposal for the museum was to consist of “a transformable exhibition space, able to fold completely and then unfold into various combinations, with hexagonal elements lifted by hydraulically-powered rotating telescopes.” The structure would transform in horizontal and vertical dimensions at the same time. In the proposal the architect wrote: “Art in its development is unpredictable. We have assumed that a contemporary gallery should pursue the unknown in art. It shouldn’t only aim at exhibiting artworks, but also encouraging and provoking their birth.” Hansen’s design was not implemented. The jury finally selected a design submitted by a team of three Polish architects: W. Klyzewski, J. Mokrzynski and E. Wierzbicki. The project by Calovski and Ivanoska is a study of multiple hypotheses surrounding the reading of art historical references. It manifests a view on historical analysis involving the documentation of Hansen’s proposal and of the possible exhibition and lecture program. The series of 12 original, limited edition posters announcing and in a way materializing the programming for the institution, would have engaged such artists as Paul Thek, Mladen Stilinovic, Andrzej Szewczyk, Ana Mendieta, Ad Reinhardt, and others. The posters were designed in close collaboration with the young German designer, Ariane Spanier.